Wild Wild West

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The quilt was the western quilt I mentioned in the Just Keep Swimming post a few weeks ago (https://catherinecureton.wordpress.com/2013/05/06/just-keep-swimming/). It is my first applique quilt and the beginning of a new obsession! I didn’t really have to learn applique for a western quilt (because there are about a million western quilts floating around on the internet), but I came across one with an image similar to this and I fell in love! The image needed some tweaking up and the original was way too small to really see much, so I enlisted my artist in residence (Spencer) to help redraw/fix the scene into something more workable for me. Then I followed the usual steps for tracing out pieces onto Wonder under, ironing the scene together and sewing the pieces down. I had some fun with texture by doing the horse and the chaps out of a suede-like fabric and leaving a loose fringe on the chaps. I used free motion quilting to sew the quilt together and get all of the fun texture in the background.

Tada!

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And Bonus! Baby onesies! I think I like these as much as I like the quilt (especially the one with the butt pockets)!

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Just Keep Swimming!

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This project was an experiment to say the least! My Granny wanted baby quilts & onesies to give as gifts to some friends who were having babies and she wanted them to match the nursery themes. One wanted western and the other wanted Nemo (you’ll see the western one later).

I couldn’t find examples of Nemo themed quilts ANYWHERE and embroidering enough Nemo patterns on my machine for a quilt would have been too much of a hassle because of how small the hoop is….so I decided to learn applique! Technically this is my second applique quilt (because I finished the western one first) but I am no expert. I also had no pattern…

What I found is that I LOVE applique! It is so flexible design wise and it is actually pretty easy. To make my pattern I found an image of a finding Nemo fleece blanket that I liked and searched coloring books to find the characters in similar poses. Then I brought the images into Photoshop and re sized/re adjusted to get the scene the way I wanted it. I printed the characters out on the printer at home and pieced them together with tape. Then I used my creative judgement to trace the pieces I needed out onto Wonder under fusible backing. From there it’s a long tutorial on how to applique that I won’t bore you with. Basically the Wonder under makes the fabric into an iron on transfer, so you iron it down then sew around the edges to make it permanent. There is no magical stitch that everyone likes or perfect way to do it. I used black thread and did a satin stitch (very short zig-zag) to make it look like cartoon outlines.

Also, you can’t see it here as well, but I had a lot of fun playing with free motion quilting to add water and other textures to the background

Tada! I would improve a few things for the next round, but I’m not upset with the results at all!

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And bonus! Baby onesies to match!

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Pinwheel Quilt

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Ok…I’m back. New goal- 1 post/week. My problem is remembering to photograph my work! I’ve got finished projects for the next few months if I can keep up the 1/week rule, so wish me luck!

This quilt was done as a Christmas gift (2 1/2 moths ago!) for my Granny. The tutorial comes from my favorite website, Moda Bakeshop (www.modabakeshop.com). Moda Bakeshop is full of great tutorials, made by people who use Moda brand fabric. It is also where I find most of my favorite patterns! This one is called Eli’s Wheel and the tutorial can be found here:http://www.modabakeshop.com/2011/09/elis-wheels-quilt.html#more

It uses a pre-cut “jelly roll” (one of my favorite cutting shortcuts). Jelly rolls consist of 40 pre-cut strip of fabric 2 1/2″ x 44″ that can be combined in a variety of ways. If you’re new to quilting or have limited cut space or bad wrists, jelly rolls are a great option because they drastically reduce the amount of cutting you have to do and they are very accurate (both important for quilting).

Here are just a few examples of the variety you can get with jelly rolls (2 by me – 1 on the to do list)

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Here are some better views of the pinwheel quilt. For my next quilt I want to attempt either free motion quilting (VERY hard/ scary) or hand quilting (time consuming!).

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Margie’s Quilt

These photos have been hanging out in my computer for a while now, just waiting for Margie’s birthday! And now that she has turned another year older I finally get to share.

This quilt was created several months before Margie’s birthday, when I found a jelly roll of fabrics in her favorite colors on sale at JoAnn’s. I discretely asked for design advice on a quilt for “somebody else” to make sure she would like the pattern I picked, but never showed her the fabric because it would have been a dead give away …sometimes it’s fun to be devious!

I can’t remember exactly which tutorial I finally went with, but it might have been this on:

http://beesquarefabrics.blogspot.com/2009/03/how-to-make-zig-zag-quilt-without.html

It was great because I didn’t have to cut or sew any odd angles which meant less fabric waste!

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